HomeNews & PublicationsPress ReleasesJohns Hopkins APL Provides Key Instruments for NASA's New Discovery Missions 

January 6, 2017

Johns Hopkins APL Provides Key Instruments for NASA’s New Discovery Missions

RAVAN CubeSat
NASA’s Lucy mission will launch in 2021 for the first reconnaissance of the Trojans, a population of primitive asteroids orbiting in tandem with Jupiter. In this artist’s concept (not to scale), the Lucy spacecraft is flying by Eurybates, one of the six diverse and scientifically important Trojans to be studied. Credit: Southwest Research Institute

 
RAVAN CubeSat
L’LORRI is a version of the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) — currently flying on NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft — tailored to Lucy’s mission to observe several Trojan asteroids. Built by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, LORRI provided the sharpest views ever of Pluto’s diverse and dynamic surface, like this image of the dwarf planet’s icy mountain ridges and cratered plains. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/Southwest Research Institute

 
RAVAN CubeSat
The Psyche mission will launch in 2023 to study the asteroid 16 Psyche, shown in this artist’s impression. This asteroid is of great scientific interest because it appears to be the exposed nickel-iron core of a protoplanet, one of the building blocks of the sun’s planetary system. The asteroid is most likely a survivor of violent hit-and-run collisions, common when the solar system was forming. 16 Psyche may be able to tell us how Earth’s core and the cores of the other terrestrial planets came to be. Credit: Arizona State University

 

Scientists and engineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory will provide instruments on NASA’s two newest missions, Lucy and Psyche, which will explore, respectively, six of Jupiter’s Trojan asteroids and 16 Psyche, a rare and primarily metal asteroid in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

Both Discovery-class missions were selected to explore these relics from the earliest history of the solar system, less than 10 million years after the birth of our sun.

APL will provide the “eagle eyes” for Lucy by developing a high-resolution telescopic camera for the mission, which will perform the first reconnaissance of the Trojans, a population of primitive asteroids orbiting in tandem with Jupiter.

Lucy — named for the famous prehistoric human fossil — will launch in 2021 to study six of these asteroids. Scientists say understanding the differences between the Trojans will provide unique and critical knowledge of planetary origins, the source of volatiles and organics on the terrestrial planets, and the evolution of the planetary system as a whole.

The APL instrument is the next-gen version of the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) currently flying on the New Horizons spacecraft, which provided the first detailed, close-up views of Pluto and its moons in July 2015. Among other capabilities, the L’LORRI camera — the first “L” added to mark its role on the Lucy mission — will produce Lucy’s highest spatial resolution surface maps, which will allow scientists to chart the asteroids’ geology and estimate surface ages.

“Lucy is an exciting mission at the frontier of planetary science,” said APL’s Hal Weaver, the L’LORRI principal investigator. “We’re excited about the opportunity to provide a camera with proven heritage that will shed light on these critical links to the solar system’s early history.”

For Psyche, APL will provide the Psyche Gamma Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS), which will detect, measure, and map 16 Psyche’s elemental composition. The instrument is based on the APL-developed GRNS flown on the successful MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) Discovery-class mission.

Unlike most asteroids, which are made of rock and ices, 16 Psyche appears to be the exposed nickel-iron core of a protoplanet, one of the building blocks of the sun’s planetary system. GRNS will test this hypothesis by measuring 16 Psyche’s elemental composition. If confirmed, these observations will be the first to directly characterize the composition of a planetary core, providing insights into the inaccessible cores of the terrestrial planets, including Earth and Mars.

“Psyche is one of the few remaining unexplored frontiers of our solar system,” said APL’s David Lawrence, the Psyche GRNS instrument and investigation lead. “The data returned by APL’s GRNS will be foundational for revealing the mysteries of this fascinating world. Our entire GRNS team is grateful to play a key role in this exciting mission.” Lawrence’s team, which includes lead engineer John Goldsten and instrument scientist Patrick Peplowski, brings its experience from the successful MESSENGER GRNS to the Psyche mission.

APL’s long heritage of space technology innovation reaches back more than five decades, and includes building 69 spacecraft and more than 150 specialized instruments. In addition to the New Horizons LORRI, the APL instrument roster includes the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument on the Cassini spacecraft, which provided the first images of Saturn’s magnetic field; the CRISM hyperspectral imager on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which contributed to the discovery of water across the red planet; and the Low Energy Charged Particle detector on Voyager, which was critical to determining that Voyager 1 had left the solar system.

The Psyche mission will launch in 2023 and will arrive at the asteroid 16 Psyche in 2030. Arizona State University is the principal investigator institution; NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory will build the spacecraft and manage the mission. The Lucy mission will launch in October 2021 and fly by its targets between 2025 and 2033. In all, Lucy will study six Trojans and one main belt asteroid. Southwest Research Institute is the principal investigator institution and will lead the science investigation. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center will provide overall mission management, systems engineering, and safety and mission assurance.

Watch an overview of the Psyche mission.

Media contact: Michael Buckley, 240-228-7536, michael.buckley@jhuapl.edu

The Applied Physics Laboratory, a not-for-profit division of The Johns Hopkins University, meets critical national challenges through the innovative application of science and technology. For more information, visit www.jhuapl.edu.